Advances in Biomedical Engineering

Seventh Centenary lecture

– Tuesday, 19th February 2008

Speaker: Professor Lionel Tarassenko on “Advances in Biomedical Engineering”

Professor Lionel Tarassenko on “Advances in Biomedical Engineering”. Biomedical Engineering is a relatively new subject but advances in body scanners (from CT to MRI) in the last 2 decades have had a major impact on the practice of medicine. Oxford engineers have made significant contributions to the development of medical imaging and in other areas of biomedical engineering also, for example in artificial knees and needle-free injection of drugs and vaccines. The lecture reviewed Oxford’s contribution to advances in biomedical engineering over the last 25 years and highlighted how the Department’s new Institute of Biomedical Engineering plans to develop technology for the hospital of the future and for personalised healthcare Link

Lionel Tarassenko is the Professor of Electrical Engineering (since 1997), and previously gained the degrees of BA in Engineering Science (1978) and DPhil in Medical Engineering (1985) from the University of Oxford. His research has been focused on the development of signal processing techniques and their application to diagnostic systems. He is a founder director of Oxford BioSignals Ltd and t+ Medical Ltd (formerly e-San Ltd).

Professor Tarassenko is a Fellow of the Institution of Electrical Engineers and of the Royal Academy of Engineering. He is the Bioengineering Theme leader for the joint NHS/University Oxford Biomedical Research Centre (2007-2011), and will become the Director of the Department’s new Oxford Institute of Biomedical Engineering in September 2008.

Précis: Biomedical Engineering is a relatively new subject but advances in body scanners (from CT to MRI) in the last 2 decades have had a major impact on the practice of medicine. Oxford engineers have made significant contributions to the development of medical imaging and in other areas of biomedical engineering also, for example in artificial knees and needle-free injection of drugs and vaccines.

The lecture reviewed Oxford’s contribution to advances in biomedical engineering over the last 25 years and highlighted how the Department’s new Institute of Biomedical Engineering plans to develop technology for the hospital of the future and for personalised healthcare.

Our special thanks to: Our thanks go to Technikos for generously supporting this lecture.

Lecture: See a video of the lecture online.>>http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/events/centenary/movies/tarassenko2008.html

Source:>>http://www.eng.ox.ac.uk/events/centenary/lecture7.html

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